All News

Teach-In on Global Migrations&Refugees

Teach-In on Global Migrations&Refugees

The public event will follow a morning session for educators, from 9 am to 12:15 pm, discussing historical background on migration to the US and to the Middle East and North Africa. The afternoon public segment will include a panel on 21st-century migration issues and then lectures on experiences of migration in the Middle East and North Africa from multiple speakers. See more here: https://www.facebook.com/events/160561484492258/?active_tab=about

Read More
Reflections on the United States  and the Middle East

Reflections on the United States and the Middle East

Robert Malley was appointed Vice President for Policy at the International Crisis Group in March 2017. He had been Special Assistant to the President, Senior Advisor to the President for the Counter-ISIL campaign, and White House Coordinator for the Middle East, North Africa and Gulf Region in 2015-2016; prior to that he was Senior Director for the Gulf Region and Syria.

Read More
THEEB: Film Screening and Discussion, April 20

THEEB: Film Screening and Discussion, April 20

1916. While war rages in the Ottoman Empire, Hussein raises his younger brother Theeb in a traditional Bedouin community that is isolated by the vast, unforgiving desert. The brothers' quiet existence is suddenly interrupted when a British Army officer and his guide ask Hussein to escort them to a water well located along the old pilgrimage route to Mecca.

Read More
Political Economy of Development Series

Political Economy of Development Series

1. Development Under Authoritarian Rule: Tuesday, February 21, 12 pm 2. Workshop on Development: February 28, 12 pm 3. Political Economy of Oil: April 4 4. Workshop on oil : April 11, 12 pm

Read More
Xenophobia and Islamophobia in the Modern Era

Xenophobia and Islamophobia in the Modern Era

In recent years, the United States has witnessed an increase in xenophobic and Islamophobic rhetoric. The prevalence of inaccurate information about immigrants and Muslims has resulted in significant fear and mistrust in many communities. This panel discussion will present facts about these two specific groups in order to promote greater understanding and empower audience members to engage in informed activism.

Read More
STATUS/الوضع Issue 3.1 is Out!

STATUS/الوضع Issue 3.1 is Out!

Amidst the rambunctious MESA (Middle East Studies Association) conference atmosphere, we and all our partner organizations are happy to announce the release of STATUS/الوضع Issue 2.3. By far, this is our richest and most diverse issue yet, with something for every taste, whether it is current events, history, culture, poetry, music, or otherwise. Lots of gratitude to our guests, hosts, and team for delivering this colossal installment. With Status turning one, and just prior to a major overhaul of our online platform, we are proud to present our latest installment of interviews in our most stellar issue yet! This issue will be remembered for being the one with the most Arabic language interviews to date. This is not an arbitrary coincidence, but rather a testament to our commitment to ground the topics we discuss in regional dynamics and local intricacies. Along with partner organizations, we are happy to announce the release of STATUS/الوضع Issue 3.1 [See Arabic here], our most ambitious issue yet

Read More
NPR Correspondent Tom Gjelten speaks at IIR Colloquium

NPR Correspondent Tom Gjelten speaks at IIR Colloquium

The Institute for Immigration Research (IIR) hosted Tom Gjelten, correspondent for National Public Radio and author of A Nation of Nations: A Great American Immigration Story, at the April colloquium. Mr. Gjelten shared his insights on how the landscape of America has changed over the past fifty years with the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, as told through the experiences of families in one suburban county in Virginia.

Read More
“Kandahar Journals”: Conflict without Conclusion

“Kandahar Journals”: Conflict without Conclusion

Last Monday, photojournalist Louie Palu screened his film “Kandahar Journals” in the Johnson Center Cinema as part of the Visiting Filmmakers Series sponsored by GMU's Film and Media Studies. The film focuses on Palu’s experiences as an embedded photojournalist in the Kandahar province of Afghanistan from 2006 to 2010.

Read More
Reem Abou-El-Fadl, Revolutionary Egypt: Connecting Domestic and International Struggles

Reem Abou-El-Fadl, Revolutionary Egypt: Connecting Domestic and International Struggles

The book project brought together thirteen scholars from academic disciplines as diverse as political economy, comparative politics, and social anthropology. Its chapters span Egypt’s post-Mubarak and post-Mursi political transformations, all considered in light of earlier periods.

Ali Issa, Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle in Iraq

Ali Issa, Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle in Iraq

The book attempts to bring into English a wide cross section of Iraqi political analysis, organizing strategy, and recent history from several social movement sectors.

Adi Kuntsman and Rebecca L. Stein, Digital Militarism: Israel’s Occupation in the Social Media Age

Adi Kuntsman and Rebecca L. Stein, Digital Militarism: Israel’s Occupation in the Social Media Age

The authors focus on “digital militarism.” Digital militarism is a broad and flexible concept, with wide global applicability, but the authors consider the ways it has unfolded in the context of Israel’s occupation.

Cities Media Roundup

Cities Media Roundup

This is a monthly roundup of news articles, and other materials related to urban issues in the region, and beyond.

NEWTON in Focus: Critical Studies of Islam

NEWTON in Focus: Critical Studies of Islam

NEWTON in focus highlights various texts relevant to the critical study of Islam, across a variety of perspectives, disciplinary approaches, and political frameworks. Texts deal with the history of Islam, Islamic law, Islam and gender, and contemporary Islamic political movements and regimes.

Read More
New Texts Out Now: Ali Issa, Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle in Iraq

New Texts Out Now: Ali Issa, Against All Odds: Voices of Popular Struggle in Iraq

Collected from dozens of interviews with, and reports from, Iraqi feminists, labor organizers, environmentalists, and protest movement leaders, Against All Odds presents the unique voices of progressive Iraqi organizing on the ground. Dating back to 2003, with an emphasis on the 2011 upsurge in mobilization and hope as well as the subsequent embattled years, these voices belong to Iraqis asserting themselves as agents against multiple local, regional, and global forces of oppression.

Read More
Jadaliyya: NEWTON 2015 in Review

Jadaliyya: NEWTON 2015 in Review

Since it was first launched in the fall of 2011, the New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) Page has been honored to have the opportunity to feature an astonishing range of books, articles, special issues of journals, and films for Jadaliyya readers. This past year was no exception. With authors generously agreeing to discuss their new works, offer background information on their research, and allow us to post excerpts from their books and articles, we have been able to offer first looks at some of the most important new work in the field, from established names and rising stars alike.

Read More
Andrea Khalil, Gender, Women, and the Arab Spring

Andrea Khalil, Gender, Women, and the Arab Spring

The literature of gender studies in the Middle East and North Africa is the main theoretical source for the authors of the volume. But each contributor has her own point of entry into the question of gender dynamics since the Arab Spring.

Smadar Lavie, Wrapped in the Flag of Israel: Mizrahi Single Mothers and Bureaucratic Torture

Smadar Lavie, Wrapped in the Flag of Israel: Mizrahi Single Mothers and Bureaucratic Torture

Wrapped in the Flag of Israel seeks to expose and explore the predicaments and conundrums facing Mizrahim in Israel and how intra-Jewish racism relates to the Palestine-Israel and Arab-Israeli conflicts.

STATUS/الوضع: Issue 2.1 is Live!

STATUS/الوضع: Issue 2.1 is Live!

Status is an evolving critical, collaborative, and independent monthly audio journal combining analysis, reporting, and satire. It is mainly comprised of hard-hitting interviews/conversations, on-the-scene reports, reviews, informed commentary, and readings.

Elisabeth Anker, Orgies of Feeling: Melodrama and the Politics of Freedom

Elisabeth Anker, Orgies of Feeling: Melodrama and the Politics of Freedom

Orgies of Feeling analyzes how US politics is shaped at key historical moments, and in particular in the twenty-first century, by “melodramatic political discourse.” In political discourse, melodrama depicts political events through a moral worldview that identifies the nation-state as an innocent victim of villainous action.

Read More
Hisham Aidi, Rebel Music: Race, Empire, and the New Muslim Youth Culture

Hisham Aidi, Rebel Music: Race, Empire, and the New Muslim Youth Culture

Rebel Music engages the literature on black internationalism, critical race theory, urbanism, and transnationalism. The book draws on political science approaches to counter culturalist explanations of Muslim youth alienation, to show that extremism and extremist discourses are a response to and product of state policy.

Read More
NEWTON 2014 Year in Review

NEWTON 2014 Year in Review

The work spans disciplines, regions, and methodological and theoretical approaches. It features a range of books, articles, special issues of journals, and films for readers in 2014.

Read More
Francesco Cavatorta and Paola Rivetti, EU–MENA Relations from the Barcelona Process to the Arab Uprisings

Francesco Cavatorta and Paola Rivetti, EU–MENA Relations from the Barcelona Process to the Arab Uprisings

The article reflects on the state of the art of the scholarship on EU foreign policy towards the MENA to highlight the contribution that it has made, or failed to make, to the broader field of European foreign policy.

Jadaliyya: Photography Media Roundup December 2014

Jadaliyya: Photography Media Roundup December 2014

Isabelle Werenfels, Beyond Authoritarian Upgrading: The Re-Emergence of Sufi Orders in Maghrebi Politics

Isabelle Werenfels, Beyond Authoritarian Upgrading: The Re-Emergence of Sufi Orders in Maghrebi Politics

The article employs an agency-oriented approach that takes into account key structural constraints and opportunities linked to social and economic rules of political games in the contemporary Maghreb. It identifies key factors leading to the top-down revival of Sufi orders and highlights regime policies, their variance, and their contradictions.

Status Audio Journal

Status Audio Journal

An evolving, critical, collaborative, and independent monthly Audio Journal combining analysis, reporting, and satire. It features interviews/conversations, on-the-scene reports, reviews, informed commentary, and readings. Interviews from the region and beyond will feature activists, journalists, scholars, and citizens.

Cities Media Roundup (October 2014)

Cities Media Roundup (October 2014)

This is a monthly roundup of news articles, and other materials related to urban issues in the region, and beyond.

Cities Media Roundup (September 1-30)

Cities Media Roundup (September 1-30)

This is a monthly roundup of news articles, and other materials related to urban issues in the region, and beyond.

ISIS in the News: Extensive Media Roundup

ISIS in the News: Extensive Media Roundup

The challenge of writing about ISIS is multi-faceted, but rests mainly in the fact that we simply do not have enough corroborated information/knowledge about all aspects of the phenomenon. This collection of articles (in Arabic and English), videos, and events on ISIS is the beginning of an ongoing series of work on ISIS.

Read More
Photography Media Roundup (September)

Photography Media Roundup (September)

This is a monthly roundup of articles on photography in the Middle East and reflects a wide variety of opinions.

Myriam Ababsa, Atlas of Jordan: History, Territories, and Society

Myriam Ababsa, Atlas of Jordan: History, Territories, and Society

This atlas aims to explain the formation of Jordanian territories over time, and to present the legacy inherited by the Emirate of Transjordan in 1921.

Cities Media Roundup (August)

Cities Media Roundup (August)

This is a monthly roundup of news articles, and other materials related to urban issues in the region, and beyond.

New Texts (NEWTON) Compilation by Category For Fall Semester

New Texts (NEWTON) Compilation by Category For Fall Semester

As we head back into the school year, here are some of the most creative and groundbreaking works in Middle East studies that have been featured in the year 2013-2014.

Anthony Alessandrini, Frantz Fanon and the Future of Cultural Politics

Anthony Alessandrini, Frantz Fanon and the Future of Cultural Politics

Most of the book is set up as a series of dialogues, in order to bring Fanon’s work into conversation with a number of contemporary writers, texts, and contexts. One strand that runs through all of these chapters involves the question of humanism.

Paul Kelemen, The British Left and Zionism: History of a Divorce

Paul Kelemen, The British Left and Zionism: History of a Divorce

The book examines the process by which the Zionist movement gained dominance over Anglo-Jewry. It looks at the attraction of Zionism, and later of the state of Israel, to the left.

New Texts Out Now By Joel Beinin and Lisa Hajjar (Revised and Updated Edition)

New Texts Out Now By Joel Beinin and Lisa Hajjar (Revised and Updated Edition)

This text offers a basic introduction to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Last updated in 2001, the revised edition provides a comprehensive look at the conflict for those with no previous knowledge of the subject.

Cities Media Roundup (July 1-28)

Cities Media Roundup (July 1-28)

This is a monthly roundup of news articles, and other materials related to urban issues in the region, and beyond.

Melani Cammett, Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon

Melani Cammett, Compassionate Communalism: Welfare and Sectarianism in Lebanon

The provision of welfare and the dynamics of sectarian or ethnic politics share an important commonality, namely that they both involve the construction and maintenance of boundaries of inclusion.

Cities Media Roundup (June 1-25)

Cities Media Roundup (June 1-25)

This is a monthly roundup of news articles, and other materials related to urban issues in the region, and beyond.

NEWTON Summer Reading

NEWTON Summer Reading

Summer reading list featured on Jadaliyya's New Texts Out Now (NEWTON) page from 2013-2014. The reading list contains interviews about and excerpts from works across a range of topics and disciplines.

Read More
Andrea Khalil, Women, Gender, and the Arab Spring

Andrea Khalil, Women, Gender, and the Arab Spring

The literature of gender studies in the Middle East and North Africa is the main theoretical source for the authors of the volume. But each contributor has her own point of entry into the question of gender dynamics since the Arab Spring.

Kimberly Wedeven Segall, Performing Democracy in Iraq and South Africa

Kimberly Wedeven Segall, Performing Democracy in Iraq and South Africa

This book uses the lens of affect theory to show how ordinary people navigate loss with blogs, songs, and protest plays, highlighting traumatic legacies that lead to changing religious and national affinities. The book highlights the complexity of women’s voices in democratic transitions.

Introducing Al-Diwan

Introducing Al-Diwan

Tadween Publishing’s blog is transforming into Al-Diwan. The move attempts to capture the spirit of a shift towards creating an open space for discussion.

Read More
Joseph Sassoon, Saddam Hussein's Ba'th Party: Inside an Authoritarian Regime

Joseph Sassoon, Saddam Hussein's Ba'th Party: Inside an Authoritarian Regime

The book examines how the Ba‘th Party dominated life in Iraq. By analyzing the party structure, the book looks at the party’s relationship with the security agencies, the army, and the civil population.

NEWTONs You May Have Missed

NEWTONs You May Have Missed

With the spring semester coming to an end, we wanted to take an opportunity to remind you of some of the amazing NEWTON posts we have posted since January that you might have missed the first time around—especially those of you starting to think about your summer reading list.

Read More
NEWTON 2013 Year in Review

NEWTON 2013 Year in Review

This is work that spans disciplines, regions, and methodological and theoretical approaches. We offer it for scholars working in the field, as well as teachers and students looking for recently published sources in Middle East studies.

Stephen Day, Regionalism and Rebellion in Yemen

Stephen Day, Regionalism and Rebellion in Yemen

My book fits into a category of new studies in the field of contemporary history, politics, culture, religion, and international relations concerning the underlying dynamics of the 2011 Arab democratic spring. Readers of the book will learn that Yemen stands out as a unique participant in this dramatic moment of world history.

Maaike Voorhoeve, Family Law in Islam

Maaike Voorhoeve, Family Law in Islam

All our contributions are about matters of marriage and divorce, but each focuses on a particular country in the region (Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Iran, and Yemen). The book is divided into two parts: the first part talks about public debates on family law reforms, and the second part talks about practices of judges, lawyers, and litigants.

Read More
India: Wounded States (Special Issue of Warscapes)

India: Wounded States (Special Issue of Warscapes)

This issue addresses literature stemming from postcolonial, sub-national conflicts within India, many of which have resulted in long-term military occupations. It also takes into account representations of marginalized Muslim populations who have been historically discriminated against in a Hindu-majority nation.

Annika Marlen Hinze, Turkish Berlin: Integration Policy and Urban Space

Annika Marlen Hinze, Turkish Berlin: Integration Policy and Urban Space

The book introduces the reader to the basic ideas and historical developments of citizenship and identity in Germany throughout the twentieth century. It also deals with immigration and identity, tackling more theoretical questions regarding group and individual identity, and why certain ethnic and cultural symbolisms are so important to national identity.

Mohammad Salama and Rachel Friedman, Locating the Secular in Sayyid Qutb

Mohammad Salama and Rachel Friedman, Locating the Secular in Sayyid Qutb

The article is in dialogue with contemporary understandings of the secular and the doctrine of secularism, both Western and Egyptian. It takes up Talal Asad’s discussions in Formations of the Secular: Christianity, Islam, Modernity with the goal of expanding his study of the secular, particularly in Egypt.

The History of Syrian Revolt: Structural Causes and Dynamics

The History of Syrian Revolt: Structural Causes and Dynamics

Professor Bassam Haddad, Director of the Middle East Studies Program, presents a lecture on Syria at Harvard University. Sponsored by Harvard University's Center For Middle Eastern Studies on Tuesday, March 4th.

A Roundtable Discussion: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey

A Roundtable Discussion: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey

Professor Bassam Haddad, Director of the Middle East Studies Program, joins a roundtable discussion at Harvard University. This event coincides with the launch of the JadMag volume, “Resistance Everywhere”: The Gezi Protests and Dissident Visions of Turkey, published by Jadaliyya and Tadween Publishing.

Jadaliyya Monthly Edition (January 2014)

Jadaliyya Monthly Edition (January 2014)

Check out the January 2014 Monthly Edition of roundups, editors picks, and articles from Jadaliyya.

Hilal Elver, The Headscarf Controversy: Secularism and Freedom of Religion

Hilal Elver, The Headscarf Controversy: Secularism and Freedom of Religion

The headscarf is a very good metaphor for uncovering the hidden agendas of various governments, as well as situating different forms of political and social competition, identifying gender inequality, and detecting emerging Islamophobia. The book is not only about Turkey, although a significant portion is devoted to the country where the headscarf has been such a core issue of controversy. It also deals with influential decisions of the European Court of Human Rights, and discusses the headscarf controversies in some pivotal European countries such as France and Germany.

Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, Libya, Social Origins of Dictatorship, and the Challenge for Democracy

Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, Libya, Social Origins of Dictatorship, and the Challenge for Democracy

The regime’s early progressive policies in supporting education for most men and women in the country created a high expectation for political and social rights. But by 2011, the regime was isolated and out of ideas. The very young men and women who were educated under the regime are the ones who challenged it. The current revolution is urban, not rural, as have been most resistance movements in Libyan modern history.

Rebecca Joubin, The Politics of Love: Sexuality, Gender, and Marriage in Syrian Television Drama

Rebecca Joubin, The Politics of Love: Sexuality, Gender, and Marriage in Syrian Television Drama

Through a close viewing of over two hundred and fifty musalsalat (miniseries) spanning from the 1960s to post-uprising, analysis of hundreds of press reports, Facebook pages, and comprehensive interviews with drama creators over the years, my research aims to show that Syrian intellectuals have crossed over the red lines, questioned the foundation of regime legitimacy, and actively subverted the regime’s grand narratives.

Amahl Bishara, Back Stories: US News Production and Palestinian Politics

Amahl Bishara, Back Stories: US News Production and Palestinian Politics

Back Stories is one of the first studies to focus on fixers and producers, people whose work often goes unrecognized. In looking at the roles of Palestinians in US and other international media organizations, we can explore a larger set of skills and values within the field of journalism.

Farha Ghannam, Live and Die Like a Man: Gender Dynamics in Urban Egypt

Farha Ghannam, Live and Die Like a Man: Gender Dynamics in Urban Egypt

Live and Die like a Man draws on studies of gender, intersectionality, performativity, and embodiment to analyze masculinity as a contextual process that is shaped by multiple forces, agents, and discourses.

Nadje Al-Ali and Deborah Al-Najjar, We Are Iraqis: Aesthetics and Politics in a Time of War

Nadje Al-Ali and Deborah Al-Najjar, We Are Iraqis: Aesthetics and Politics in a Time of War

In the midst of an ongoing humanitarian crisis and the violence, destruction, killings, and widespread sufferings inside Iraq, we did not hear the voices of contemporary Iraqis. While media and academicians centered on suicide attacks, Islamist militias, occupation forces, political leaders, political processes, and the oil economy, we did not find in-depth and creative explorations of and engagements with the rich and diverse forms of cultural expressions that have been part of historical and contemporary Iraq.

Syria Crisis Panel Drew A Crowd

Syria Crisis Panel Drew A Crowd

The crisis in Syria escalated in light of the news reports of the usage of chemical weapons by the Assad regime. Given the heated discussions within the international community about whether or not military intervention would help appease the situation, the Center for Global Studies organized a panel discussion on September 18, 2013 to engage the Mason community in this debate.

Read More
Jeannie Sowers, Environmental Politics in Egypt: Activists, Experts, and the State

Jeannie Sowers, Environmental Politics in Egypt: Activists, Experts, and the State

In Egypt, as elsewhere, environmental issues are often viewed as secondary to issues of “high politics,” such as national elections and debates among political elites. Yet so many of the core concerns of politics—power, resources, justice—are most clearly seen in who has access to land, health, water, and other essential services and goods. “Environmental” concerns, broadly conceived, are thus central to political debates and substantive outcomes concerning representation, accountability, and social justice.

Vijay Prashad, The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South

Vijay Prashad, The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South

The Poorer Nations takes up the story from the OPEC price hike in 1973, alongside the New International Economic Order (NIEO) debate of that year and the formation of the G7 the following year, through to the defeat of the Third World Project, to the formation of the BRICS group and the transformations in the South from below—including the Bolivarian initiative and the Arab Spring.

Read More
Rashid Khalidi, Brokers of Deceit: How the US Has Undermined Peace in the Middle East

Rashid Khalidi, Brokers of Deceit: How the US Has Undermined Peace in the Middle East

The book addresses some of the common distortions of language that are so prevalent where the Palestine issue is concerned in Israeli-American official and media discourse.

Ray Bush, Turmoil in North Africa

Ray Bush, Turmoil in North Africa

This collection of essays brings together contributions to ROAPE that provide a radical assessment of the uprisings in North Africa. The collection does two things. First, it accounts for the historical sequence of events that led to the most astonishing processes of political turmoil in Egypt and Tunisia. Second, the collection locates the uprisings and toppling of dictatorships in an analysis of the relevant national political economies.

Haddad: Mulling Syria strike is an 'uncalculated adventure'

Haddad: Mulling Syria strike is an 'uncalculated adventure'

Former State Department Spokesperson P.J. Crowley, Mouaz Moustafa from the Syrian Emergency Task Force, Bassam Haddad from George Mason University, Reuter's David Rhode and and MSNBC military analyst Colonel Jack Jacobs join MSNBC's Craig Melvin to discuss the possible outcomes to the President's decision on seeking congressional approval before action into Syria.

Read More
Toby Matthiesen, Sectarian Gulf: Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the Arab Spring That Wasn't

Toby Matthiesen, Sectarian Gulf: Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the Arab Spring That Wasn't

The book is essentially an account of the petitions, protests, and crackdowns that occurred across the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. In particular, it focuses on the protests in Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait, but also discusses the protests in Oman, as well as the developments in the UAE and Qatar. The book shows that contrary to popular wisdom, the Gulf states did experience popular protests, and the political consciousness of many Gulf residents has changed significantly since 2011.

Lori Allen, The Rise and Fall of Human Rights: Cynicism and Politics in Occupied Palestine

Lori Allen, The Rise and Fall of Human Rights: Cynicism and Politics in Occupied Palestine

In Palestine, the language and laws of the human rights system helped motivate new forms of collective action, and became a source of creativity and even courage for some people living under occupation. The book traces the ways in which foreign funding and the establishment of the PA shaped the human rights world in the occupied Palestinian territory from the 1990s onwards.

NEWTON Summer Reading List!

NEWTON Summer Reading List!

We would like to provide you with ample summer reading material by reminding you of several new texts that we have featured in recent months. This compilation of works spans a wide range of topics and disciplines by prominent authors in the field of Middle East studies

Mark Fathi Massoud, Law's Fragile State: Colonial, Authoritarian, and Humanitarian Legacies in Sudan

Mark Fathi Massoud, Law's Fragile State: Colonial, Authoritarian, and Humanitarian Legacies in Sudan

Sudan was the first sub-Saharan African country to achieve colonial independence from the British. Its post-independence period has been wracked by warfare, slaughter, and instability. One of its many interconnected civil wars was Africa’s longest. It ignited in 1983 and by the time peace accords were signed in 2005, more than two million people had been killed and Sudan was left with the world’s largest population of internally displaced persons.

The Arab Studies Journal's Twentieth Anniversary Issue

The Arab Studies Journal's Twentieth Anniversary Issue

We can scarcely believe that two decades have passed since the publication of the first issue of the Arab Studies Journal. We are proud and humbled to have published groundbreaking work by scholars at the onset of their careers as well as at the pinnacle. During the last twenty years, the Journal has taken part in extraordinary changes in the field of Middle Eastern studies: paradigm shifts (and, on occasion, returns), the growth of once-nascent fields (like gender and sexuality studies), and the emergence of exciting new subfields.

Read More
Adel Iskandar and Bassam Haddad, Mediating the Arab Uprisings

Adel Iskandar and Bassam Haddad, Mediating the Arab Uprisings

Mediating the Arab Uprisings speaks to several varied issues. From journalistic coverage and conflict/war reporting across the region to the representation of specific discourses on competing networks, the book is an extensive contestation of different levels of mediation.

Vijay Prashad, The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South

Vijay Prashad, The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South

The Poorer Nations takes up the story from the OPEC price hike in 1973, alongside the New International Economic Order (NIEO) debate of that year and the formation of the G7 the following year, through to the defeat of the Third World Project, to the formation of the BRICS group and the transformations in the South from below—including the Bolivarian initiative and the Arab Spring. It fills in the story left hanging at the end of The Darker Nations.

Read More
This Semester's Final Event!

This Semester's Final Event!

This Semester's Final Event!

This Semester's Final Event!

Rashid Khalidi, Brokers of Deceit: How the US Has Undermined Peace in the Middle East

Rashid Khalidi, Brokers of Deceit: How the US Has Undermined Peace in the Middle East

It is not a comprehensive history of US Middle East policy, or even of US policy on Palestine. Instead, it focuses on three “moments”: one is the period 1978-82; another is the 1991-93 negotiations; and the third is the last two years of Obama’s first term. I saw that the specific patterns of US bias in favor of inflexible Israeli positions, which we had seen in our negotiations with the Israelis under Bush and Clinton, were precisely mirrored before that in the Carter and Regan administrations, and that little or nothing has changed under this president.

Hamid Dabashi, The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism

Hamid Dabashi, The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism

I had just finished my book on the Green Movement, Iran, the Green Movement, and the USA: The Fox and the Paradox (2011), when the Arab Spring started, and it was only natural for me to continue that reflection into a wider domain. The Arab world is a second homeland to me. For the decades that I have not been able to go back to Iran, the Arab world, from Morocco to Lebanon and Syria down to Egypt and the Persian Gulf states, have been like home to me. Palestine in particular is central to my moral and imaginative geography. So everything—from my scholarship to my politics—came together for me to write this book.

Read More
NEWTON in Focus: Thinking Through Gender and Sex

NEWTON in Focus: Thinking Through Gender and Sex

This week we highlight various NEWTON texts relevant to the study of gender and sexuality. The authors of these texts write from a wide range of perspectives, approaching questions relevant to the MENA region from a variety of cultural and political contexts and (inter)disciplinary approaches. We encourage you to integrate these texts into your curricula in the coming semesters.

Read More
Orientalism and Musical Mission

Orientalism and Musical Mission

Orientalism and Musical Mission presents a new way of understanding music's connections with imperialism, drawing on new archive sources and interviews and using the lens of 'mission'. Rachel Beckles Willson demonstrates how institutions such as churches, schools, radio stations and governments, influenced by missions from Europe and North America since the mid-nineteenth century, have consistently claimed that music provides a way of understanding and reforming Arab civilians in Palestine. Beckles Willson discusses the phenomenon not only in religious and developmental aid circles where it has had strong currency, but also in broader political contexts.

Books and Historical Amnesia

Books and Historical Amnesia

A new documentary has reignited the conversation about confiscated Palestinian property. The Great Book Robbery by Israeli filmmaker Benny Brunner chronicles the story of the nearly 30,000 books that were stolen and either burned or stored away in Israel’s National Library. The National Library, in cooperation with the Haganah (a Zionist militia that would later become the Israeli military) and Hebrew University systematically pillaged books from Arab neighborhoods in Jerusalem, Haifa, Jaffa, Nazareth, and beyond. All of the extracted books were subsequently labeled AP for “abandoned property.”

Read More
NEWTON in Focus: Egypt

NEWTON in Focus: Egypt

This week we highlight various NEWTON texts relevant to the study of Egypt. The authors of these texts write from a wide range of perspectives and approach questions with which Egypt has grappled, not only in the wake of Tahrir, but throughout its modern existence.

Unmaking North and South: Cartographies of the Yemeni Past, 1857-1934

Unmaking North and South: Cartographies of the Yemeni Past, 1857-1934

John M. Willis, Unmaking North and South: Cartographies of the Yemeni Past, 1857-1934. New York: Columbia University Press, 2012.

Book Discussion on Business Networks in Syria from Fall for the Book

Book Discussion on Business Networks in Syria from Fall for the Book

Bassam Haddad discussed his book, Business Networks in Syria: The Political Economy of Authoritarian Resilience, and talked about the current political conflict in that country which had led to the deaths of thousands of civilians and uncertainty about regional security. Mr. Haddad was interviewed at the “Fall for the Book” festival, held at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. He responded to questions from the audience.

Read More
Mason now offers Master’s Degree in Middle East and Islamic Studies

Mason now offers Master’s Degree in Middle East and Islamic Studies

The Ali Vural Ak Center is pleased to announce that the interdisciplinary Master’s degree program in Middle East and Islamic Studies has been approved by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. The program, headed by Dr. Peter Mandaville and Dr. Bassam Haddad from the Department of Public and International Affairs, as well as Dr. Maria Dakake from the Department of Religious Studies, launches formally in Fall 2013, but Mason will be accepting a small group of applicants for earlier admission in Spring 2013.

Read More
New Documentary Filmed at the Syrian Border

New Documentary Filmed at the Syrian Border

PBS Newshour Interview with Bassam Haddad

PBS Newshour Interview with Bassam Haddad

As more Syrian officials remove themselves from the regime government, it would seem that President Bashar al-Assad's grip over Syria is weakening. Margaret Warner talks to George Mason University's Bassam Haddad and Trinity University's David Lesch about whether recent defections signal a tipping point or are merely symbolic.

Read More
Syrian Outcome Could Alter Neighbor's Future

Syrian Outcome Could Alter Neighbor's Future

The Syrian situation is complex like any other uprising, but the situation has added complexity because it is at the juncture of several conflicts in the region. Those struggles involve local, regional and international power plays that make the situation a lot more charged.

Read More
Future of Syria

Future of Syria

Bassam Haddad, Steven Heydemann, Salwa Ismail, and Marc Lynch discuss the future of Syria on C-Span

Read More
The Transformation of the Syrian Revolution in the light of the impending UN Security Council vote

The Transformation of the Syrian Revolution in the light of the impending UN Security Council vote

Dr. Bassam Haddad, on Al-Jazeera English, addresses the impending UN Security Council vote regarding Syria, and asserts that the Syrian revolution is undergoing a transformation that alters the scope of "diplomatic" efforts.

The Arab Uprisings and U.S. Policy: What is the American National Interest? Faculty Afoot

The Arab Uprisings and U.S. Policy: What is the American National Interest?

Watch the complete recording of the 64th Capitol Hill Conference, featuring a discussion of the populist movements sweeping across the Arab world, their regional and global consequences, and how they are impacting U.S. interests and policy choices. This Conference featured speakers Anthony Cordesman, Bassam Haddad, Barak Barfi, Karim Mezran, and Moderator Thomas R. Mattair.

Read More
After Syria's "Great Friday": Al-Jazeera Interview with Bassam Haddad

After Syria's "Great Friday": Al-Jazeera Interview with Bassam Haddad

Al-Jazeera's interview on Syria with Jadaliyya Co-Editor Bassam Haddad after the events of "Great Friday" on April 22nd, the bloodiest day that Syria witnessed since the beginning of the uprisings. In this interview, conducted on Saturday April 23rd, Bassam discusses the events as a turning point in the confrontation and the prospects for cohesion on all sides. He also addresses the role of the media, and media wars.

Haddad Discusses Situation in Syria

Haddad Discusses Situation in Syria

Bassam Haddad discusses the situation in Syria with Democracy Now! The War and Peace Report. Syrian police reportedly opened fire and used tear gas today on thousands of anti-government protesters who occupied a key square in the Syrian city of Homs. More than 10,000 protesters gathered there Monday after funerals for an estimated 25 activists killed over the weekend.

Read More
Al-Jazeera Interview with Jadaliyya Co-Editor on Syria

Al-Jazeera Interview with Jadaliyya Co-Editor on Syria

This is a two-part interview (10 minutes total) conducted with Jadaliyya Co-Editor Bassam Haddad on Monday, April 19, in reference to what amounts to be an escalation in the regime-protesters confrontation in the city of Homs.

The Golden Cage Press Release, by Dr. Shirin Ebadi Publications

The Golden Cage Press Release, by Dr. Shirin Ebadi

Shirin Ebadi, the first Muslim woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize (2003), and the only Iranian to receive a Nobel Prize in any field, releases a new memoir in April 2011 entitled The Golden Cage: Three Brothers, Three Choices, One Destiny.

Read More
Haddad on Al-Jazeera In The Media

Haddad on Al-Jazeera

Bassam Haddad discusses reactions to Syrian President Bashar's speech in a March 30, 2011 interview.

Read More
Haddad Cited in AP News Story In The Media

Haddad Cited in AP News Story

A March 25, 2011 AP news story on Syria's protests cites Bassam Haddad, "The start of the protests' outbreak far from the urban centers makes Syria's uprising like Tunisia's, in which protests in the peripheries spread to the cities.... That doesn't necessarily mean the regime is in danger."

Read More
Hadddad on Syria in Bloomberg.com In The Media

Hadddad on Syria in Bloomberg.com

The March 26, 2011 news section of Bloomberg.com quotes Bassam Haddad on Syria. “The regime has made a decision based on and in anticipation of further demonstrations that would require repressive measures ....”

Read More
Why Syria is Unlikely to be Next...for Now In The Media

Why Syria is Unlikely to be Next...for Now

As millions of Arabs stir their respective countries with demonstrations and slogans of change and transition, certain Arab states have been generally spared, including some oil rich countries and Syria.

Haddad Published by Al-Jazeera

Haddad Published by Al-Jazeera

Al-Jazeera, an international news source, recently published an opinion piece on the balance of power in the Middle East by Dr. Bassam S. Haddad. Dr. Haddad is the Director of the Middle East Studies Program at George Mason University.

Read More
Katz on US Options in Yemen

Katz on US Options in Yemen

The Daily Star, an international, English daily newspaper, recently published an article by Mark N. Katz, a professor with Mason's Public and International Affairs Department.

Read More
Senior Donahue Back on Campus After Year in the Middle East

Senior Donahue Back on Campus After Year in the Middle East

In the fall of 2008, anthropology major Robert Donahue attended a George Mason University career fair, looking to become more marketable to potential employers seeking students majoring in anthropology. A year later, he traveled to the Middle East in pursuit of the same goal.

Read More
Neoliberal Economic Restructuring and Worker Rights in Egypt

Neoliberal Economic Restructuring and Worker Rights in Egypt

Dr. Joel Beninin speaks on Egypt's Neoliberal Economic Restructuring and the Struggle for Worker Rights. Beninin is a professor of middle east history at Stanford University and the former director of middle east studies at the American University in Cairo. Monday, October 25, 2010

Read More
Placeless Laws and Lawless Places

Placeless Laws and Lawless Places

The Middle East Studies Program hosts Laurie King, anthropologist and Georgetown University professor, for a lecture on universal jurisdiction and multi-site ethnography. Thursday, October 7, 2010

Read More
Terror and Torture: The Trial of Omar Khadr

Terror and Torture: The Trial of Omar Khadr

Sociologist Lisa Hajjar lectures on the case of Omar Khadr. Khadr is the youngest person imprisoned at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. Hajjar is an associate professor of sociology at UC Santa Barbara. Monday, October 04, 2010.

Read More
Warren Brown and Robert Pinsky to Speak at Convocations

Warren Brown and Robert Pinsky to Speak at Convocations

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences is proud to announce the speakers for this year’s convocation ceremonies. Warren Brown, the founder and owner of successful bakery CakeLove and Love Café’, and poet and author Robert Pinsky are the speakers for this year’s convocation ceremonies.

Read More
Middle East Studies Newsletter

Middle East Studies Newsletter

The Middle East Studies program launches its first newsletter. Read about fall events, the faculty, and the new minor in Middle East studies, among many other things. Middle East Studies Newsletter Fall 2009 (.pdf)

Comparative Panel to Discuss Global Economic Crisis

Comparative Panel to Discuss Global Economic Crisis

A comparative panel featuring Dr. Bassam Haddad, Dr. Hazel McFerson and Dr. Ming Wan will discuss how the current economic crisis has affected economic development. Considered leaders in their respective fields of research, these three scholars will convene on Nov. 11 at 12 p.m. at Mason Hall in an event that is free and open to the public.

Read More
Mason Welcomes New Islamic Studies Program Director

Mason Welcomes New Islamic Studies Program Director

George Mason University welcomes Dr. Cemil Aydin as the new director of its Center for Global Islamic Studies. Aydin joined Mason’s History and Art History Department in the fall of 2009, holding the Endowed IIIT Chair in Islamic Studies, bringing with him years of experience in the fields of history and Middle Eastern studies.

Read More
Religious Studies Welcomes Islamic Studies Professor

Religious Studies Welcomes Islamic Studies Professor

This fall, the Religious Studies Department welcomes Dr. Juliane Hammer to its distinguished list of professors. Dr. Hammer, who received her PhD in Islamic studies from Humboldt University in Berlin, has a wealth of experience in teaching Islamic studies having taught at Princeton, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Elon University.

Read More
Iraqi the Focus of Arabic Dialects Class

Iraqi the Focus of Arabic Dialects Class

George Mason University offers ARAB 380, a class that explores the different dialects of the Arabic language. In fall 2009, the class will focus on Iraqi. “Iraqi is the dialect that concerns many Americans these days,” said Sana Hilmi, Arabic program coordinator. She adds that because Iraq is a hot spot, many students go there, and they would like to learn this dialect. It is a dialect that needs to be studied because of the many linguistic changes it represents.

Read More